Team Novo Nordisk | Diabetes & Holiday Eating

Diabetes & Holiday Eating

13 December 2018

Food can play a big role during the holidays, and for people with diabetes, this can often mean dealing with the myths and misconceptions about what you can and can’t eat.

Below the Team Novo Nordisk Pro riders share their experiences with “diabetic” food during the holidays.


TEAM NOVO NORDISK | TNN Talks: Chris WilliamsCHRIS WILLIAMS

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I think “diabetic” food is certainly a good idea. Low-sugar versions of food certainly make it easier to manage blood sugar levels; however, there’s nothing quite like the original version!

It may take a little more planning and some more caution when eating “normal” sweet foods, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible!

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea?

You may think that you are simply being considerate when giving someone “diabetic” food. However, for me it only points out that many think that people with diabetes are different to everyone else.

We can eat “normal” food, so the decision should be up to us on whether we would like to choose a “diabetic” alternative.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

One Christmas, when I was first diagnosed, my mother decided that I needed a low-sugar version of ice cream and pudding.

Although her intentions were good, those versions actually tasted horrible, and I would have preferred the “normal” version! And although she thought I needed “diabetic” dessert, there was no “diabetic” alternative to all of the pasta, bread, potato bake and stuffing that was on offer.


Umberto Poli | TEAM NOVO NORDISKUMBERTO POLI

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I think sugar-free candy can be a good idea because it can allow us to enjoy treats without adding more insulin units.

And I think it’s good for all people to eat less sugar and calories.

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea? 

I think that anyone who wants to give me candy containing less sugar is good because it means that the person is thinking of helping me with small gestures.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

This hasn’t happened to me in recent years, but I would be very pleased to know that someone would have a special eye towards my diabetes.


Emanuel Mini | TEAM NOVO NORDISKEMANUEL MINI

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I think that “diabetic” foods should not exist, but I do enjoy foods containing less sugar.

I think the most important thing is to be aware and educated about your diabetes, about the amount of food to ingest, the right time to do it and proper blood glucose management. If we do that, I think we can eat most any type of food with no problem.

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea? 

I would tell you that it is a good idea! It is always nice to receive sweet gifts.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

Whenever my friends or family have thrown me a party, they prepared special food and drink as if I were impaired! When all I really want is to be the birthday boy!


Joonas Henttala | TNN Talks | TEAM NOVO NORDISKJOONAS HENTTALA

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I don’t think “diabetic food” is real food. It is usually more processed, hence not so good for human body. In my opinion, the best “diabetic food” is simple, healthy food that everyone should eat!

Also, as long as I exercise regularly, I can eat pretty much anything I want (in moderation, of course, like everyone else).

Exercise and diabetes is a great combination and helps make consuming different types of food possible, even candy every now and then (on special occasions like Christmas!).

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea?

I much prefer to have “real” food as a gift.

Of course, healthy choices are always better. But for me, a nice, quality chocolate is better gift than low-sugar, “diabetic” chocolate.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

My mom used to buy me ”low-sugar” options years ago. I just ate more of it, as I found it less satisfying.

For me, a small piece of good-quality cake with good coffee is a better treat than two blocks of ”healthy chocolate”. And in my experience, my blood sugar management with the latter is much worse.


Fabio Calabria | TEAM NOVO NORDISKFABIO CALABRIA

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I think that labeling any food “diabetic” shows a lack of understanding about diabetes and diabetes management.

But I think there is a place for low-sugar candy and most that I have tried tend to be just as tasty as the “real” thing.

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea?

I think it shows thought and care if someone goes out of their way to get someone something specific for them. So I would not be offended if someone was to gift me sugar-free candy.


David Lozano | TEAM NOVO NORDISKDAVID LOZANO

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

In my opinion, food is food, and I need to choose the right kind of food for any circumstance.

If I’m riding I will eat fast-acting sugars like candy, but if I have a travel day and not doing much activity, I will choose different kind of foods like vegetables or something like that.

What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea?

I think when people offer you this kind of food it’s because they care about you but they don’t have much idea about diabetes.

I think we should be the ones who ask for the kind of food we want to eat.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

I never had that experience, but many times people say, “drink a coke because you look low” and “maybe you are just tired”.


Stephen Clancy | Team Novo NordiskSTEPHEN CLANCY

What do you think about “diabetic” food and candy?

I never buy or eat it to be honest. I’m not afraid of eating “regular” food or candy, even if they do have more carbohydrates. “Diabetic” food is often a lot more expensive and doesn’t taste as good.

 What would you say to people who want to know if “gifting” you diabetic food and candy is a good idea?

I wouldn’t say no, but I’m just as happy with the “normal” varieties. There’s no need to make the effort to go looking for diabetic-friendly versions, as it makes no difference to me.

Is there a time when someone gave you sugar-free candy or diabetic-friendly food and you wished they hadn’t? 

I was given sugar-free Turrón (a typical Spanish dessert eaten at Christmas), and it tasted great. But I also ate all the other sugary Turrón, so it really wasn’t necessary. However, I appreciated the thought.

Tags:

"It may take a little more planning and some more caution when eating “normal” sweet foods, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible!"

Share this story:

  play_circle_filled
import_contacts
import_contacts
import_contacts